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Technical experts often earn promotions into team leadership roles based on their technical skills, without receiving training on the communication skills necessary to effectively lead diverse teams and nurture a healthy organizational culture.

Angie Pastorek, Ph.D., program manager and faculty member for the Professional Workplace Communication Graduate Certificate and master’s degree, expressed this point during the “Improving Your Cultural IQ: Recognizing the Power of Inclusive Communication” event early this fall.

lab

A comprehensive approach is accelerating research and breakthroughs in human, animal and environmental health in the region. The community is invited to celebrate and learn more about this approach at Kansas City One Health Day, a free event from 4-6:30 p.m. Nov. 1 at K-State Olathe.

Dr. Tara Lin

Tara Lin, MD, who recently became medical director for the Clinical Trials Office at The University of Kansas Cancer Center, is on a mission.

She has committed to making the best possible care available for everyone in the region. Citing the challenges of serving diverse populations – especially in Kansas, with its urban, suburban and rural populations – her aim is to coordinate with doctors from all over the state to make care more accessible.

The Kansas City business community has a strong reputation for entrepreneurship, technical skills and business acumen. KU Edwards Campus (KUEC) courses are tailored to help area professionals succeed in the local marketplace. This not only requires specialized, technical training, but also calls for the soft skills necessary to foster a healthy, productive workplace.

Roy Jensen, MD, director for The University of Kansas Cancer Center

By Roy Jensen, MD, director for The University of Kansas Cancer Center

Last September, we completed an exhaustive multi-year effort to submit our application to the National Cancer Institute for consideration of: 

Nearly eight years ago, Tyler O’Neal was working for a small, family-owned construction business when the recession hit. Always interested in computers, he decided to pursue a new career in technology.

In 2010, he started at Garmin International Inc. as a product support specialist. Not long after, he realized the power of education in climbing the ladder and earned his associate degree in IT with an emphasis in information systems technology from Johnson County Community College (JCCC). This led to his advancement to his current role as software engineer tool support developer.

The Mid-America Regional Council reports that the number of 25- to 34-year-olds with bachelor's degrees in either science, technology, engineering or mathematics — the STEM fields — has grown by 20 percent in Kansas City since 2000. Nevertheless, the region still trails Oklahoma City, Denver, St. Louis and other peers in having a robust STEM workforce.

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As Ed Eilert completes his eight-year term as chair of the JCERT Authority and hands the leadership reigns to Overland Park Mayor Carl Gerlach, the two recap the organization’s accomplishments to date and give a glimpse into future endeavors.

By Dr. Janice Barrow, associate dean for academic affairs and executive education
K-State Olathe

Greater Kansas City needs more highly educated and STEM-qualified workers in order for the region to stay competitive and meet current and future workforce demand, according to findings of a 2014 report by the Brookings Institute. Additional reports from the Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute and KC Rising reinforce those findings and note that similar-sized cities are outperforming our region in having a pipeline of STEM-educated talent.

What business challenges does your organization face? Mergers and acquisitions? Identifying new markets? Budgeting? Staffing? An increasingly diverse workforce? A relentless need to increase revenues and minimize costs? All of these?

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