Blog

Phyllis Greenquist displaying poster Small World Initiative

Phyllis Greenquist is learning how scientists may one day be able to engineer replacement organs for people like her who are in need of a lung transplant.

Pursuing KU’s JCERT-supported online Bachelor of Health Sciences degree at the Edwards Campus (KUEC) in Overland Park more than 35 years after her high school graduation, Kansas City native Phyllis Greenquist exemplifies resilience.

CiCi Rojas, president of Tico Productions

CiCi Rojas, president of Tico Productions, and a cancer survivor and former clinical trial participant, is helping lead a multicultural campaign in partnership with the KU Cancer Center to encourage clinical trial participation in minorities across the region.

Minority populations suffer from cancer disproportionately, yet current clinical research data for minorities is scarce. According to 2020 Food and Drug Administration data, 73% of clinical trial participants were white, 14% Asian, 6% Hispanic and 5% Black.

women sitting at computer coding.

K-State Olathe is offering four Digital Skills Bootcamps as alternative learning pathways for local professionals to access future-focused education for a tech-driven business world.

Digital Skills Bootcamps at K-State Olathe are helping local professionals quickly transition to in-demand tech careers, while addressing the demand for thousands of unfilled jobs in Greater Kansas City.

JCERT program enrollment growth graph

JCERT funding for KUEC is specifically earmarked for business, engineering, science and technology programs.

The latest KU Edwards Campus (KUEC) enrollment news reveals a 12.4% increase in year-over-year student credit hours in degree and certificate programs supported by the Johnson County Education Research Triangle.

vice-chancellor of KU Cancer Center’s Clinical Trials Office, Natalie Streeter

New assistant vice-chancellor of KU Cancer Center’s Clinical Trials Office, Natalie Streeter, discusses the latest in breakthrough clinical trials and cancer research.

 At any given time, The University of Kansas Cancer Center is managing about 600 clinical trials across the cancer continuum, with approximately 250 of those trials actively enrolling participants.

Ariana Engleheart

Ariana Englehart was motivated to go back to school to provide a better future for her children, and, as a working single parent, the flexibility of KUEC’s JCERT-supported BBA program allowed her to balance her responsibilities while pursuing her education.

The road to earning her bachelor’s degree in business administration was anything but easy for 35-year-old KU graduate Ariana Englehart. 

KUCC Faith Works

The KU Cancer Center is working with Faith Works, a consortium of researchers and church leaders, to spread the word about the importance of cancer prevention and screenings among the African American community.

African Americans have the highest death rate and shortest survival rate for most cancers of any racial or ethnic group in the U.S. That’s why scientists at The University of Kansas Cancer Center are working hard to overcome these hurdles, and they’re doing it in a unique way.

Can I afford college?

College degrees provide long-term value and are made more affordable through accelerated degree programs, in-state tuition rates for non-Kansas residents and financial aid.

It’s no secret. Earning a college degree can be expensive. That’s why JCERT’s higher education partners – the KU Edwards Campus and K-State Olathe – provide options that make college affordable and offer degrees that provide a return on those investments.

KU Alzheimer's Disease Center

The KU Alzheimer’s Disease Center is using a three-year, $4.3 million award to help enhance its dementia research and care efforts across the city, state and region.

Scientists at the University of Kansas Alzheimer’s Disease Center (KC ADC) are convinced the path to beating back the life-robbing disease goes through clinical trials fueled by research volunteers willing to join the battle.

Latino graduates

The Latino community is rapidly growing in both Johnson County and the United States. As a result, higher education institutions are increasing their opportunities and outreach to Latino communities.

Increasing the number of Latino students in Greater Kansas City's community, state and private colleges has become a key focus for K-State Olathe.

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